Category Archives: Personality

My Thoughts on Binibining Pilipinas 2021 Coronation Night!

I absolutely loved this edition of Binibining Pilipinas and it may actually be the one of the best editions for me. What’s freaking insane is that it is the first time it was actually televised in real-time! And with no live audience too well…because Covid. Ahem. So, I have to talk about a few things this edition has offered us.

The Binibining Pilipinas 2021 was supposed to be the year 2020 edition but due to the pandemic, it was moved a year later which is the very first time the pageant was not held since it’s inception in 1964. However, Samantha Mae Bernardo, Binibining Pilipinas 2019 Second Runner-up and was a contestant of the supposed 2020th edition was appointed the Philippines’ representative to the 2020-2021 Miss Grand International earlier this year making her the only title holder to wear a 2020th sash! So many fun facts!

Another first for this edition is its all-female hosts with two former Binibining Pilipinas queens – Miss Universe 2018 Catriona Gray and 2016 Binibining Pilipinas Grand International and 2016 Miss Grand International First Runner-up, Nicole Cordoves. Catriona and Nicole not only made a Binibini history last night, they also did an incredible job that it’s hard to imagine them not doing this every single year moving forward!

The Stage: It looks amazing! It was simple and classy looking with its three gigantic led screens! Easier

The Opening: Donning yellow, orange and lime-green cocktails dresses, the girls dances a to a new Binibining Pilipinas song! It was catchy and they all looked absolutely amazing! The introduction was a sight to behold too, showing each Bibibini in their respective National Costumes! It was marvelous! The costumes are simply to die for! Why are we not seeing these kind of costumes in the international level though? Hmmm…

The board of judges are also a batch of impressive panel that includes Rajo Laurel, Maria Garcia, Dioceldo Sy, Benito Bengzon Jr, Pinky Webb, Enrique Gil, Miss International 2016 Kylie Versoza and the ever-so-beautiful actress Liza Soberano! Can I just say that Liza looked like a goddess last night!

First two set of awards:

Best in National Costume: Nueva Ecija, Marian Ruth Erika Quin


Miss Friendship: Tagum City, Lesley Anne Ticaro
Miss Talent: Bocaue, Bulacan, Vianca Louise Marcelo
Miss Photogenic: Manila, Patrizia Mariah Garcia
Miss Alagang Silka: Angeles, Pampanga, Ma. Francesca Taruc
Jag Denim Queen: Masbate, Hannah Arnold
Miss World Balance: Olongapo, Alexandra Faith Garcia
Miss Ever Bilena: Batangas, Maureen Montagne
Miss Piza Hut: Iloilo, Karen Laurrie Mendoza
Manila Bulleting Readers Choice Award: Batangas, Mica Rosal

Last batch and some major awards:

Bb. Araneta City: Angeles, Pampanga, Maria Francesca Taruc
Miss Creamsilk: Batangas, Maureen Montagne

Best in Swimsuit: Valenzeula, Meiji Cruz
Best in Long Gown: Eastern Samar, Gabrielle Basiano

The proceedings was fast! The top 12 were announced right away plus a Top 13th people’s choice voted via the Binibining Pilipinas app, and they paraded in Swimsuit and their beautiful Evening gown! It was such a glorious sight!

My favorites for the swimsuit round are: Maureen Montagne, Hannah Arnold and Meiji Cruz.

As for the Evening Gown, it was obviously Gabrielle Basiano with that presentation that totally nailed the round! Another one of my favorite for this round is Hannah Arnold with her baby pink gown ensemble and Graciella Lehman with her effortless pasarela!

As each finalists is called into the top 12/13, she will deliver a short message about her pandemic experience (this is almost similar to the opening speech in the Miss Universe during its 2018 and 2019 edition)

Here are my on the spot notes last night for each finalists!

  1. Eastern Samar, Gabrielle Basiano – too short, prolly got nervous but very beautiful face.
  2. Manila, Patrizia Mariah Garcia – reminds me of Aya Abesamis. Very simple message. Challenging governance…
  3. Iloilo, Karen Laurrie Mendoza – Loved her accent! talks about mental illness is not a sign of weakness, you are heard, you matter – a really thoughtful and relevant message.
  4. Oriental Mindoro, Graciella Lehman – talked about being a cabin crew and to be in the service of fellow Filipinos.
  5. Angeles Pampanga, Francesca Taruc – to be more grateful and appreciate little things in life. Quick. Message was okayish.
  6. Valenzuela, Meiji Cruz (Cat said Venezuela – a cute mistake) – loved her Pinoy accent, very good message. Unity, compassion together we can heal!
  7. Albay, Jashmin Dimaculangan – very on point message!!! talks about Typhoon Ulysses during the pandemic
  8. Cavite, Samantha Panlilio – very good communication skills, her family are from the tourism industry and how in perseverance we can survive this pandemic.
  9. Quezon Province, Patricia Babista – being a frontliner, aims to face a new world with a healthier, braver and kinder human
  10. Rizal Province, Honey Cartasano – loved her styling! regain her purpose thru volunteering in helping her kababayan!
  11. Masbate, Hannah Arnold – As a forensic science graduate she wanted the country to invest on science and prevent another pandemic. Very good.
  12. Batangas, Maureen Montagne – I witness firsthand the true beauty and strength of community. Siargao community pantry, together we can overcome any obstacle. Lovely messaging too!
    People’s Choice / Fan Vote
  13. Cagayan de Oro – Misamis Oriental – Cinderella Fae Obeñita very good messaging! With her personality, I wonder why she missed the first cut in the first place…

Another segment is an interview with Miss International 2013 Bea Rose Santiago who’s battling a end-stage renal failure and she delivered a lovely message of hope to the girls and to us viewers! Get well soon, Bea!

Can I just talk about how amazing the Evening Gown presentation was? I mean, that’s international level of production! Each girl in the top 13 talks about their chosen gown and the symbolism it represents! So powerful!

Moving on to the ‘dreaded’ Q&A, it’s obvious that a lot of girls were nervous. Overall, I thought they all gave amazing answers! It just boils down to presentation and how confident they are with their answers!

The one that top this segment is surprisingly Miss Cagayan de Oro – Misamis Oriental Cinderella Fae Obeñita. She just sealed her win with that answer!

Winners!

Second Runner-up: Meiji Cruz, Valenzuela

I loved Meiji. She’s such a stunner but I didn’t expect her to place this high after the Q&A but overall, she’s probably in the upper tier of the scoreboard to nab this title.

First Runner-up: Gabrielle Basian, Borongan Eastern Samar

Her Q&A wasn’t that bad. I thought she gave an apt answer to the question even though she faltered a bit. It’s obvious that her performance there affected her overall placement. I thought she’d get one of the major titles if I’m being honest pegging her to win the Bb. Pilipinas-Intercontinental title.

Binibining Pilipinas Globe 2021: Maureen Montagne, Batangas

I really thought that Maureen would either win the International or the Grand International title so I was very surprised that she got Globe! It’s still a crown after all and she very much deserved a crown, regardless of the title! She was unstoppable last night!

Binibining Pilipinas Intercontinental 2021: Cinderella Fae Obeñita, Miss Cagayan de Oro – Misamis Oriental

As I’ve mentioned above, her gift of gab is her major strength that none of the girls probably expected! She was such a revelation and she should thank her lucky stars that she won the fan vote! Tonight was her destiny fulfilled!

Binibining Pilipinas Grand International 2021: Samantha Panlilio, Cavite

Samantha is definitely one of the best speakers in this batch and I was also on the lookout for her during the first few months of the competition but that excitement died down as the other girls started to peaked so I was very much surprised that she was named to follow suit Samantha Bernardo in Miss Grand International. Samantha reminded me of the Binibining Pilipinas-Universe prototypes of the early 2000’s. I’m excited to see her transformation on her quest to win the first ‘golden crown’ for the Philippines.

Binibining Pilipinas International 2021 – Hannah Arnold, Masbate

Binibining Pilipinas International 2021: With the Miss Universe pageant no longer affiliated with Binibini, Miss International takes center stage as the premier crown for the most prestigious pageant in the country! Hannah Arnold rightfully and deservedly won this major crown last night with her flawless performance emulating a doll and humble demeanor which the Japanese couldn’t seem to resist! She’d definitely do well in Japan later this year!

Overall, I am just in awe of the level of production, the girls, the hosts, the judges – they just set a new standard on how to stage a pageant in the new normal!

Congratulations, Binibining Pilipinas!

Watch the full show of the Binibining Pilipinas 2021 Grand Coronation Night on their official Youtube Channel.

All images are courtesy of Binibining Pilipinas Official Facebook Page.

Book Review: The President is Missing by Bill Clinton and James Patterson

I’ve recently received a copy of this as a gift, and I wasn’t expecting much from it. I am not that familiar with Patterson’s style. However, I’ve read his Women’s Murder Club series and a couple (I think) from his Alex Cross, ages ago and I seem to remember generally liking his writing. And with President Bill Clinton as a collaborator, I thought this would be an interesting read given the premise of the book.

I do find the beginning of the book a bit slow and unexciting. I thought there are just too many details that won’t affect the plot without being too verbose. The title, by the way, was a catchy one. I mean, it’s the ‘President trying to save the US’ premise but with twists and turns that was quite compelling.

I find the President’s characterization a bit too much, If I’m honest. He is a former marine and a prisoner of war in Iraq who has lost his wife to cancer and has a blood disease too! I mean, the dude just couldn’t get a break in life. But hey, he’s the President, and it’s his responsibility to stop a virus from destroying the country!

Over time, I find myself not wanting to put it down! Hah! It’s admittedly quite engaging because it’s the state of affairs in the US and the entire world nowadays. Everything is online, and cyberterrorism is a critical issue facing particularly powerful nations such as the US.

I think it’s interesting to see a scenario like this and see what the President would do in such a situation, and with Bill Clinton at the helm of this story, it makes it more believable. We get insights into what a ‘good’ president / or good people in the government are willing to do for the common welfare of the country.

Overall, I thought it was enjoyable. I find the poignancy of the message from the President at the end quite touching, although it could get a bit preachy too, but hey, this is politics at the end of the day. I’d recommend this for people looking to read an excellent political thriller!

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Kindle Edition, 513 pages
Published June 4th 2018 by Little, Brown and Company and Knopf

About The Authors
James Patterson is one of the best-known and biggest-selling writers of all time. His books have sold in excess of 375 million copies worldwide. He is the author of some of the most popular series of the past two decades – the Alex Cross, Women’s Murder Club, Detective Michael Bennett and Private novels – and he has written many other number one bestsellers including romance novels and stand-alone thrillers.

James is passionate about encouraging children to read. Inspired by his own son who was a reluctant reader, he also writes a range of books for young readers including the Middle School, I Funny, Treasure Hunters, Dog Diaries and Max Einstein series. James has donated millions in grants to independent bookshops and has been the most borrowed author of adult fiction in UK libraries for the past eleven years in a row. He lives in Florida with his wife and son.

William Jefferson Clinton was the 42nd president of the United States. After leaving the White House, President Clinton established the William J. Clinton Foundation with the mission to strengthen the capacity of people in the United States and throughout the world to meet the challenges of global interdependence. His Clinton Global Initiative brings together global leaders to devise and implement innovative solutions to some of the world’s most pressing issues. He served as the UN Envoy for Tsunami Recovery and is now the UN Special Envoy to Haiti.

Please also note that this blog is reader-supported. When you buy through links on my site, I may earn an affiliate commission.

Mariel de Leon’s Reputation

 

After her comments against the appointment of Mocha Uson to a government post and even after she apologized for it, Mariel de Leon has been villainized by the Pro-Duterte and Pro-Mocha Uson netizens. It was brutal and relentless to say the least. They didn’t care that Mariel will be representing the Philippines in the international stage. They want her to fail. They want her to receive her bad “karma.” They want this “arrogant” beauty queen to get what they thought she deserves – a winning-less participation in the pageant.

Is Mariel really a villain?

She spoke up. It was her opinion. A political opinion that didn’t sit well with those who voted for the current President. They said it was in bad taste. They said a beauty queen shouldn’t be so tactless. Truth be told though, what Mariel said was the the opinion so many of us were afraid to voice out because we’re afraid of the same backlash that she’s receiving until now.

She could’ve worded her opinion differently they say but Filipinos are not stupid. Let’s not dumb down ourselves. Whether she said it differently or not, the meaning will still be the same. Same difference. Same Difference folks.

She is a beauty queen so she should act accordingly. Why put her in a box? She’s clearly an intelligent woman with her own thoughts. She stood her ground and continue to do so. Just how should a beauty queen act? Which standard should they follow? They’re not mere beauties whose job is to smile and look pretty. Why continue to crucify her?

Some were even outrageously calling Mariel the most hated beauty queen ever. I wonder if people remembered Imelda Schweighart last year when she disparagingly compared Duterte to Hitler and badmouthed her fellow delegates after her non-inclusion into the Top 16 of Miss Earth which eventually leads to her resignation. I’m not trying to resurrect an old issue but did Mariel’s ‘infraction’ was too much for these people to give their support? Or even if they are unable to give their support, can they at least stop spewing negative tirades towards her?

Winning back the crown for the second consecutive year is not unheard of; although it’s never happened in Miss International. A runner-up finish would still receive negative critiques from her haters. A win could diminish said critiques but it will still be mired with negativity.

Seriously my fellow kababayan – when will Mariel get her unnecessary vindication?

I am not affiliated with any political parties. I am not part of any beauty camps. I am not a fan of Mariel de Leon. I don’t hate her either. I am just a Filipino pageant fan. Mariel is doing her best to represent our country. For that alone, she has my support.

For me, she’s already ‘vindicated.’ For being a strong-willed woman who does not cowed to her haters, she already earned my respect.

No matter what happens in Japan tomorrow, she would still be my Miss International 2017.

Troye Sivan for SM Youth! #TroyeForSMYouth #WeAreSMYouth #SMYTH

All clothes by SM Youth Smyth. Photos courtesy of SM YOUTH

I was lurking around my Liked pages on Facebook and I stumbled upon what seems to be another “fake news” because there’s no way that Troye Sivan was actually in Manila! I mean, there was no publicity, not even a tiny bit of announcement from Troye himself but when pictures started to surface on the net – I was literally beside myself! It’s true!!! Troye was actually in Manila that day – I still have no idea how long he actually stayed here but it’s safe to say that it wasn’t that long!

See that first tweet from the the screen-grab of his twitter page – this article from CNN might be IT. Apparently,  Daddy Bean did a campaign shoot with SM Youth’s newest clothing line called SMYTH. Nicely done there SM!

I’m actually ready to go shopping in SM!!! Also, pretty please SM! Bring Troye back in Manila for a concert!!!!!

All clothes by SM Youth Smyth. Photos courtesy of SM YOUTH

SMYTH will be at the SM Youth section of all branches of The SM Store starting July 24. Follow SM Youth on Instagram and Facebook for more updates.

When Queen Bey says #ImWithHer

“There was a time when a woman’s opinion did not matter. If you were black, white, Mexican, Asian, Muslim, educated, poor or rich; if you were a woman, it did not matter,” Beyoncé said. “Less than 100 years ago, women did not have the right to vote. Look how far we’ve come from having no voice to being on the brink of making history again by electing the first woman president.”

Hillary is joined by power couple Beyonce and Jay-Z to rally the crowd in Cleveland to turn out to vote for the only sane candidate this year - and no, it ain't Donald!

Hillary is joined by power couple Beyoncé and Jay-Z to rally the crowd in Cleveland to mobilize voters and vote for the only sane candidate this year – and no, it ain’t Donald!

“We have to vote. The world looks to us as a progressive country that leads change. Eight years ago, I was so inspired that my nephew, a young black child, could grow up knowing his dreams could be realized by witnessing a black president in office,” Beyoncé addressed the crowd at the rally, which aimed at mobilizing voters in the key swing state. “And now, we have the opportunity to create more change. I want my daughter to grow up seeing a woman lead our country and know that her possibilities are limitless.

“We have to think about the future of our daughters, of our sons, and vote for someone who cares for them as much as we do,” Beyoncé added. “And that is why, ‘I’m with her.'”

 

 

Flashback Friday: Hillary Clinton’s Speech at the United Nations 4th World Conference on Women #ImWithHer

hill-yesThen First Lady of the United States Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered what would be considered as one of the most influential speeches in the women’s rights movement  at the United Nation’s 4th World Conference on Women Plenary Session on September 5, 1995 in Beijing, China
Clinton took a similar position on LGBT rights in a 2011 speech to the United Nations on International Human Rights Day, declaring “[G]ay rights are human rights, and human rights are gay rights.”]
The speech was listed as number 35 in American Rhetoric’s Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century
***
“Thank you very much, Gertrude Mongella, for your dedicated work that has brought us to this point, distinguished delegates, and guests:
I would like to thank the Secretary General for inviting me to be part of this important United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women. This is truly a celebration, a celebration of the contributions women make in every aspect of life: in the home, on the job, in the community, as mothers, wives, sisters, daughters, learners, workers, citizens, and leaders.
It is also a coming together, much the way women come together every day in every country. We come together in fields and factories, in village markets and supermarkets, in living rooms and board rooms. Whether it is while playing with our children in the park, or washing clothes in a river, or taking a break at the office water cooler, we come together and talk about our aspirations and concern. And time and again, our talk turns to our children and our families. However different we may appear, there is far more that unites us than divides us. We share a common future, and we are here to find common ground so that we may help bring new dignity and respect to women and girls all over the world, and in so doing bring new strength and stability to families as well.
By gathering in Beijing, we are focusing world attention on issues that matter most in our lives — the lives of women and their families: access to education, health care, jobs and credit, the chance to enjoy basic legal and human rights and to participate fully in the political life of our countries.
There are some who question the reason for this conference. Let them listen to the voices of women in their homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces. There are some who wonder whether the lives of women and girls matter to economic and political progress around the globe. Let them look at the women gathered here and at Huairou — the homemakers and nurses, the teachers and lawyers, the policymakers and women who run their own businesses. It is conferences like this that compel governments and peoples everywhere to listen, look, and face the world’s most pressing problems. Wasn’t it after all — after the women’s conference in Nairobi ten years ago that the world focused for the first time on the crisis of domestic violence?
Earlier today, I participated in a World Health Organization forum. In that forum, we talked about ways that government officials, NGOs, and individual citizens are working to address the health problems of women and girls. Tomorrow, I will attend a gathering of the United Nations Development Fund for Women. There, the discussion will focus on local — and highly successful — programs that give hard-working women access to credit so they can improve their own lives and the lives of their families.
What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well. That is why every woman, every man, every child, every family, and every nation on this planet does have a stake in the discussion that takes place here.
Over the past 25 years, I have worked persistently on issues relating to women, children, and families. Over the past two and a half years, I’ve had the opportunity to learn more about the challenges facing women in my own country and around the world.
I have met new mothers in Indonesia, who come together regularly in their village to discuss nutrition, family planning, and baby care. I have met working parents in Denmark who talk about the comfort they feel in knowing that their children can be cared for in safe, and nurturing after-school centers. I have met women in South Africa who helped lead the struggle to end apartheid and are now helping to build a new democracy. I have met with the leading women of my own hemisphere who are working every day to promote literacy and better health care for children in their countries. I have met women in India and Bangladesh who are taking out small loans to buy milk cows, or rickshaws, or thread in order to create a livelihood for themselves and their families. I have met the doctors and nurses in Belarus and Ukraine who are trying to keep children alive in the aftermath of Chernobyl.
The great challenge of this conference is to give voice to women everywhere whose experiences go unnoticed, whose words go unheard. Women comprise more than half the world’s population, 70% of the world’s poor, and two-thirds of those who are not taught to read and write. We are the primary caretakers for most of the world’s children and elderly. Yet much of the work we do is not valued — not by economists, not by historians, not by popular culture, not by government leaders.
At this very moment, as we sit here, women around the world are giving birth, raising children, cooking meals, washing clothes, cleaning houses, planting crops, working on assembly lines, running companies, and running countries. Women also are dying from diseases that should have been prevented or treated. They are watching their children succumb to malnutrition caused by poverty and economic deprivation. They are being denied the right to go to school by their own fathers and brothers. They are being forced into prostitution, and they are being barred from the bank lending offices and banned from the ballot box.
Those of us who have the opportunity to be here have the responsibility to speak for those who could not. As an American, I want to speak for those women in my own country, women who are raising children on the minimum wage, women who can’t afford health care or child care, women whose lives are threatened by violence, including violence in their own homes.
I want to speak up for mothers who are fighting for good schools, safe neighborhoods, clean air, and clean airwaves; for older women, some of them widows, who find that, after raising their families, their skills and life experiences are not valued in the marketplace; for women who are working all night as nurses, hotel clerks, or fast food chefs so that they can be at home during the day with their children; and for women everywhere who simply don’t have time to do everything they are called upon to do each and every day.
Speaking to you today, I speak for them, just as each of us speaks for women around the world who are denied the chance to go to school, or see a doctor, or own property, or have a say about the direction of their lives, simply because they are women. The truth is that most women around the world work both inside and outside the home, usually by necessity.
We need to understand there is no one formula for how women should lead our lives. That is why we must respect the choices that each woman makes for herself and her family. Every woman deserves the chance to realize her own God-given potential. But we must recognize that women will never gain full dignity until their human rights are respected and protected.
Our goals for this conference, to strengthen families and societies by empowering women to take greater control over their own destinies, cannot be fully achieved unless all governments — here and around the world — accept their responsibility to protect and promote internationally recognized human rights. The — The international community has long acknowledged and recently reaffirmed at Vienna that both women and men are entitled to a range of protections and personal freedoms, from the right of personal security to the right to determine freely the number and spacing of the children they bear. No one — No one should be forced to remain silent for fear of religious or political persecution, arrest, abuse, or torture.
Tragically, women are most often the ones whose human rights are violated. Even now, in the late 20th century, the rape of women continues to be used as an instrument of armed conflict. Women and children make up a large majority of the world’s refugees. And when women are excluded from the political process, they become even more vulnerable to abuse. I believe that now, on the eve of a new millennium, it is time to break the silence. It is time for us to say here in Beijing, and for the world to hear, that it is no longer acceptable to discuss women’s rights as separate from human rights.
These abuses have continued because, for too long, the history of women has been a history of silence. Even today, there are those who are trying to silence our words. But the voices of this conference and of the women at Huairou must be heard loudly and clearly:
It is a violation of human rights when babies are denied food, or drowned, or suffocated, or their spines broken, simply because they are born girls.
It is a violation of human rights when women and girls are sold into the slavery of prostitution for human greed — and the kinds of reasons that are used to justify this practice should no longer be tolerated.
It is a violation of human rights when women are doused with gasoline, set on fire, and burned to death because their marriage dowries are deemed too small.
It is a violation of human rights when individual women are raped in their own communities and when thousands of women are subjected to rape as a tactic or prize of war.
It is a violation of human rights when a leading cause of death worldwide among women ages 14 to 44 is the violence they are subjected to in their own homes by their own relatives.
It is a violation of human rights when young girls are brutalized by the painful and degrading practice of genital mutilation.
It is a violation of human rights when women are denied the right to plan their own families, and that includes being forced to have abortions or being sterilized against their will.
If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights once and for all. Let us not forget that among those rights are the right to speak freely — and the right to be heard.
Women must enjoy the rights to participate fully in the social and political lives of their countries, if we want freedom and democracy to thrive and endure. It is indefensible that many women in nongovernmental organizations who wished to participate in this conference have not been able to attend — or have been prohibited from fully taking part.
Let me be clear. Freedom means the right of people to assemble, organize, and debate openly. It means respecting the views of those who may disagree with the views of their governments. It means not taking citizens away from their loved ones and jailing them, mistreating them, or denying them their freedom or dignity because of the peaceful expression of their ideas and opinions.
In my country, we recently celebrated the 75th anniversary of Women’s Suffrage. It took 150 years after the signing of our Declaration of Independence for women to win the right to vote. It took 72 years of organized struggle, before that happened, on the part of many courageous women and men. It was one of America’s most divisive philosophical wars. But it was a bloodless war. Suffrage was achieved without a shot being fired.
But we have also been reminded, in V-J Day observances last weekend, of the good that comes when men and women join together to combat the forces of tyranny and to build a better world. We have seen peace prevail in most places for a half century. We have avoided another world war. But we have not solved older, deeply-rooted problems that continue to diminish the potential of half the world’s population.
Now it is the time to act on behalf of women everywhere. If we take bold steps to better the lives of women, we will be taking bold steps to better the lives of children and families too. Families rely on mothers and wives for emotional support and care. Families rely on women for labor in the home. And increasingly, everywhere, families rely on women for income needed to raise healthy children and care for other relatives.
As long as discrimination and inequities remain so commonplace everywhere in the world, as long as girls and women are valued less, fed less, fed last, overworked, underpaid, not schooled, subjected to violence in and outside their homes — the potential of the human family to create a peaceful, prosperous world will not be realized.
Let — Let this conference be our — and the world’s — call to action. Let us heed that call so we can create a world in which every woman is treated with respect and dignity, every boy and girl is loved and cared for equally, and every family has the hope of a strong and stable future. That is the work before you. That is the work before all of us who have a vision of the world we want to see — for our children and our grandchildren.
The time is now. We must move beyond rhetoric. We must move beyond recognition of problems to working together, to have the comment efforts to build that common ground we hope to see.
God’s blessing on you, your work, and all who will benefit from it.
Godspeed and thank you very much.”

Why James Franco Is Voting For Hillary And Why You Should Too! #ImWithHer

Watch here why ‘King Cobra’ star James Franco is voting for Hillary Clinton to be the next president of the United States!

https://www.instagram.com/p/BMSW2bdAUvO/?taken-by=jamesfrancotv

Hillary Makes History

Former First Lady, New York Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton was announced last night as the 2016 Democratic nomination, becoming the first woman to be nominated for president by a major U.S. political party.

Hillary Clinton

#ImWithHer and you should be too.

Review: There Be Dragons (2011)

via wikipedia

via wikipedia

One thing that I didn’t like about this film is that there are so many things happening in it. It was uninteresting at most parts and failed to deliver the theme at its maximum potential. The film focuses on forgiveness that inspects some aspect of life, its meaning and its purpose.

 Robert is a journalist writing a book and is trying to reconcile with his dying father whom he interviewed for his project and discovered that he had been a close friend of Josemaria Escriva, the founder of the Opus Dei movement. The story went deep as Robert learned about the dark past of his father, reluctantly sharing the stories to his son. The story takes place during the Spanish Civil War that seemed to topple what good potentials the film promised at the beginning. The production was good but it was lackluster in execution. It didn’t quite lived up to its promise of grandeur and even the extras having parts in the film were quite terrible!

 It was interesting to note that Charlie Cox who played Josemaria Escriva was quite impressive that you actually believe him and feel everything that he’s saying from his eyes. He was quite mesmerizing on the screen if I’m being honest.

 The rest of the cast were just miscast-ed or perhaps shown in such a way that are not as believable as Cox. The film would have been great if (in my opinion) Wes Bentley’s character, Manolo was played by another actor like Gael Garcia Bernal. I just don’t see enough conviction from him and even Dougray Scott who played Robert was a total disappointment.

I’m not really sure what pushes me to watch this film. It was quite interesting in its trailer but was a total disaster in its entirety. The film was okay for like the first few minutes but it went downhill up to the last part of it. Perhaps, I wasn’t feeling nice when I watched it.
Rating: 5 / 10
Director: Roland Joffe
Starring: Charlie Cox, Wes Bentley, Dougray Scott, Unax Ugalde, Olga Kurklenko, Rodrigo Santoro, Geraldine Chaplin, Golshiften Farahani
This film review was first posted at Pinoy Exchange. Read all my film reviews at Pinoy Exchange Official PEx Movie Reviews.

Review: Imelda (2003)

ImeldaSurely, one of the most fascinating people in the Philippines has got to be the former first lady herself, Imelda Marcos. I was able to catch this through the invitation of a fellow film reviewer way back in 2004. The film Imelda was directed by Ramona S. Diaz who followed Imelda Marcos for a month and was able to interview from children, Imee and Bongbong (Ferdinand Marcos. Jr.)

The documentary was quite interesting. For one, it feels like invading the former first lady’s innermost thoughts. It’s funny at some point because for some reason, her responses kinda seemed scripted – but for the most parts – it’s rather surprising to see her being so blunt in answering a lot of controversial questions especially about the “human rights violations” that transpired during the Marcos regime. It was also interesting to note that her view in dressing up was to actually provide positivity to “her” people. Can I just also say how the archives used in the film brought something back – like how prestigious the Philippines was during her time as the first lady. I mean, seriously – no offense meant about being shallow and all about the prestige or similar thought but at that time, Imelda was representing the Philippines in such a light that we almost feel like a superpower nation but alas, history would speak for itself.

Year: 2003
Genre: Documentary
Rating: 8/10
Director: Ramona S. Diaz
Starring: Imelda Marcos, Imee Marcos, Ferdinand Maros, Jr.

via Pinoy Exchange 2014 Movie Challenge
30 Days Movie Challenge – Day 12: Your favorite Documentary