Tag Archives: Call Me By Your Name

Paddylast Inc’s Oscars 2018 Predictions!

It’s the time of the year again to give out the film’s highest honors in Hollywood and I’ve a feeling that there’ll be a bit of a surprise in what most assumed are already “locked” categories.

Best Picture:
This is going to be an easy pick for me. As much as I’d love for The Shape of Water to win this award, I’ve to give it to Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. On a technical perspective and story-wise, The Shape of Water hands down wins this one but it feels like based on the most recent winners from this category, the voters tends to go to something that has a stronger and in-your face social impact. Three Billboards doesn’t have the subtlety Del Torro’s film has so that alone hurts The Shape Water’s chances.

Most Likely to Upset: The Shape of Water

Best Director:
This should go to Guillermo Del Toro. He may not win Best Picture but The Shape of Water is arguably his best work to date and it would be an injustice not to give him this nod.

Most Likely to Upset: I want to say that this is already locked for him, but for shock value I’m going to say Greta Gerwig for her directorial debut in Lady Bird. This scenario is highly unlikely but I won’t be that mad if she’d steal this one from Del Toro.

Best Actress: (Locked)
I’ve seen all of the films of the actresses nominated in this category so it’s kind of difficult for me to regard anyone as THE BEST. With that being said, I feel like Frances McDormand is already locked to win this. Sally Hawkins is a good second choice but McDormand just happened to sweep all of the precursor awards so there’s that.

Best Actor:
I’d be in the minority right here predicting an upset by Timothee Chalamet to the season’s frontrunner Gary Oldman. I initially pegged Oldman locked to win this but I’ve this nagging feeling that this would be the biggest upset of the night. Chalamet’s performance in Call Me By Your Name does seem like a once in a blue moon performance from such a very young and promising actor. In comparison to Oldaman’s stunning portrayal of Winston Churchill in the Darkest Hour, Chalamet didn’t need the help of prosthetics to actually translate something extraordinary into the screen.

Most Likely to Upset: Timothee Chalamet to Gary Oldman’s frontrunner position.

Best Supporting Actress: (Locked)
I don’t even know what to say about Allison Janney. She’s just simply sublime in I, Tonya.

Best Supporting Actor: (Locked)
Sam Rockwell’s character as a racist police officer is entirely believable that it is so easy to get angry at both the actor and the character he’s playing. That is how effective he was. This is a solid performance and no one even comes close.

Best Original Screenplay:
The Shape of Water – Guillermo Del Toro & Vanessa Taylor

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Call Me By Your Name – James Ivory

Best Animated Feature Film:
Coco – Lee Unkrich & Darla K. Anderson

Best Original Score:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi – John Williams

Best Original Song:
Remember Me from Coco by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

Best Cinematography:
Blade Runner 2049 – Roger Deakins

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:
Victoria & Abdul – Lou Sheppard

Best Production Design:
Blade Runner 2049 – Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola

Most Likely to Upset: Victoria & Abdul

Best Costume Design:
For something about Costume, this should be locked for Phantom Thread.

Most Likely to Upset: Victoria & Abdul

Best Film Editing:
Dunkirk – Lee Smith (Locked)

Best Sound Editing: (Locked)
Dunkirk

Best Sound Mixing: (Locked)
Dunkirk

Best Foreign Language Film:
Una Mujer Fantastic a (A Fantastic Woman) from Chile by Sebastian Lelio

Most Likely To Upset: Sweden’s The Square by Ruben Ostlund.

Beat Visual Effects:
Blade Runner 2049

I do not have any basis for the documentary features so I won’t make any predictions for said categories.

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Meet & Party with Timothée Chalamet & Armie Hammer via Omaze!

If you’re like super rich, you still have a chance to travel to Los Angeles, party and meet Timothée Chalamet & Armie Hammer by donating to wo incredible causes, bye entering HERE: http://bit.ly/Timothée-Armie-YOU

You could win a trip to celebrate with the Call Me By Your Name cast at their pre-Oscar party! Deadline is until February 25!

Speaking of Call Me By Your Name – James Ivory just snagged the Best Adapted Screenplay at the recently concluded BAFTA Awards! Congratulations!

 

Timothée Chalamet’s GQ Cover and Spread for March 2018

Here’s Hollywood newest darling and Oscar nominee Timothée Chalamet gracing the cover of GQ Magazine for the month of March.

 

Chalamet is nominated for Oscar’s Best Actor in a Leading Role for his breakout role as the 17-year old Italian boy Elio Perlman in the film adaptation of Andre Aciman’s book Call Me By Your Name co-starring Armie Hammer. He is up against heavyweights Daniel Day Lewis, Gary Oldman and Denzel Washington Get Out star Daniel Kaluuya.

Will he be able to pull an upset next month? We’ll have to wait and see…

photo via GQ’s Instagram.

Film Review: Call Me By Your Name (2017)

Twice I’ve seen the film on the big screen since its commercial release in the country last January 31st and twice I’ve been affected by it in such a way that no other films I’ve seen in a while had made such strong impact. If you’ve not read the book of the same name where the film was so brilliantly adapted by James Ivory, you won’t miss out that much. There are a few deviations from it but overall, it was an almost faithful retelling of Oliver and Elio’s story – a summer love affair between a seventeen-year-old Italian boy, Elio Perlman and an American university professor Oliver who has been selected to live in Elio’s parents’ home as a guest “resident” while finishing a manuscript for publication.

The number one thing that I’ve noticed while watching the film is how sedate it was. There’s the beautiful landscapes of a northern Italian country side that transports you to its 1983 time period. The relaxed vibe of the film juxtaposed the heaviness of its plot –  mainly, Elio’s struggle to understand and accept what he feels towards Oliver.

Timothée Chalamet truly and utterly made me feel what Elio felt. He totally owned Elio’s character – every roll and flick of his eyes, every nuances in his voice especially when he asked Oliver not to go. I am in so much awe of his brilliance – so young and yet with so much potential.

Chalamet and Armie Hammer had an incredible chemistry here that makes you root for them. The compatibility was there and all throughout the film, you can feel their characters’ connections.

I’d also like to praise Michael Stuhlbarg’s portrayal of Elio’s father.  Mr. Stuhlbarg is beautiful and his acting is simply sublime. I’m very surprised that Hammer got more acting nominations than him from this film. He was simply delightful to watch.

This adaptation actually made me appreciate the book a little more. I wasn’t that fond of it mainly because of Oliver but this version right here made me like him. Hammer made me appreciate his character.

Overall, I believe that this film does not need many dialogues or any major special effects. It’s wonderful as it is. Luca Guadagnino so brilliantly captured the beauty of human emotions in Elio, Oliver and the rest of its characters. It’s sedate but it’s so full of life.  It makes you appreciate yourself and your support system the way everyone has been supportive of Elio in the film.  I think it’s lovely that it does not merely focused on what’s on the headline like the whole love affair between these two guys but it delves deeper with the love that we could find around us, most especially our family. If given a chance, I’d watch this one the third time and I cannot wait to get its DVD! The film truly deserves all of the accolades it has received.

Director: Luca Guadagnino
Cast: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, Victoire Du Bois
Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

The film was nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor (Chalamet), Best Adapted Screenplay (Ivory), and Best Original Song (“Mystery of Love”) at the 90th Academy Awards.

Cover Thursday: Sufjan Stevens’ Mystery of Love by Elisa Jane

Since “Call Me By Your Name” just had its commercial release last week in Manila, I thought of featuring this beautiful and haunting song by singer-songwriter Sufjan Stevens from the movie. But since this is a Cover Thursday, I present to you Elisa Jane’s wonderful cover of the song.

Enjoy!

Listen / Buy: iTunes & Spotify 

Timothée Chalamet on the Cover of VMAN Magazine

Hollywood’s next big thing Timothée Chalamet is on his way to possibly becoming the youngest winner of the Oscars’ Lead Actor category this year given that he was able to sway the voters away from perennial favorite Gary Oldman.

As the youngest Oscar nominee for Best Actor in nearly 80 years, our cover star Timothée Chalamet is redefining the role of the leading man. Photographed by Collier Schorr, styled by Robbie Spencer, and interviewed by both Frank Ocean and Xavier Dolan, Chalamet details his upbringing in New York, working with Luca Guadagnino, his relationship with Armie Hammer, and the realities of love and pain. (s)

ICYDK: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Will Open on January 31, 2018 Nationwide!

If you’ve missed the local limited screening of the most buzzed movie of 2017 and one of this year’s Oscars’ frontrunners during the Cinema One Original Film Festival last November, don’t fret because you will get your chance to see Timothee Chalamet and Armie Hammer heat it up with their summer romance flick, Call Me By Your Name directed by Luca Gaudagnino. It is based in the book of the same name by Andre Aciman.

by Sony Pictures Classics

The film will have its nationwide release on January 31, 2018 Wednesday at select Ayala Cinema Malls!

by Sony Pictures Classics

I will be updating this once the final participating cinema schedules comes out!

Book Review: Call Me By Your Name – André Aciman

Published: January 23, 2007
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Format: Novel
Genre And Theme: LGBTQ, Romance, Coming-of-Age
Length: 268 pages, ebook
Ebook ISBN/ASIN: B004L62E08
Characters: Elio Perlman,Oliver

I’ve had this on my files for years now but never paid any attention to it until it was picked up for a film adaptation. So last night, I finally finished reading it – a good 15 days before the movie hit the theaters locally.

Call Me By Your Name is narrated by and tells the story of a seventeen-year-old American-Italian-Jewish youth, Elio Perlman, and his six-week, summer love affair with Oliver, a university professor who is seven years older than Elio and who has been selected to live in Elio’s parents’ home as a guest “resident” while finishing a manuscript for publication as part of the parents’ way of aiding budding writers.

First, let me tell you that this isn’t a five-star read for me. I’ve conflicting feelings about it. I liked it enough but then I’d think of one scene which I hated then I would hate the whole thing but then Elio will do this, Oliver will do that, Elio will say that and so on… it’s just giving me a lot of feels – good, bad, depressing, wonderful feels. I’d say that all throughout the book, I was invested enough.

In the first part of the novel, you can really tell Elio’s struggle to reign his desire, to reign his emotion. It was that youthful struggle I think most of us in some way or another have experienced. At times, it felt like his struggle to conceal his feelings for Oliver was bordering on obsession.

“I wanted him gone from our home so as to be done with him. I wanted him dead too, so that if I couldn’t stop thinking about him and worrying about when would be the next time I’d see him, at least his death would put an end to it. I wanted to kill him myself, even, so as to let him know how much his mere existence had come to bother me…”

These struggles became even harder because he is also questioning his identity and questioning people around him who might question his actions and decisions. Remember, this was set in 1980’s Italy – a predominantly Catholic country.

Although what’s affected me most is the way Aciman was able to bring forth Elio’s emotion as he narrated his times with Oliver. His observations and opinions were so real it felt like you are Elio in that moment, in that scene.

“It never occurred to me that if one word from him could make me so happy, another could just as easily crush me, that if I didn’t want to be unhappy, I should learn to beware of such small joys as well.”

I also loved that Aciman isn’t following a chronological timeline here. It goes back and forth from that one fateful summer up to the present and back again.

“You can always talk to me. I was your age once, my father used to say. The things you feel and think only you have felt, believe me, I’ve lived and suffered through all of them, and more than once—some I’ve never gotten over and others I’m as ignorant about as you are today, yet I know almost every bend, every toll-booth, every chamber in the human heart. – Elio’s Father

Now the second part has more dialogues than the first. It let’s you in more into Elio and Oliver’s interaction. Elio’s acting like his very young self – the shy but very vibrant boy of the B. Elio is definitely the life of this novel.

“What would happen if I saw him again? Would I bleed again, cry, come in my shorts? And what if I saw him with someone else, ambling as he so often did at night around Le Danzing? What if instead of a woman, it was a man?”

Tis here that you can see Elio’s funny side.

“Don’t make it difficult, don’t talk, don’t give me reasons, and don’t act as if you’re any moment going to shout for help. I’m way younger than you and you’d only make a fool of yourself by ringing the house alarm or threatening to tell my mommy. “

“This was not a dessert she was familiar with. But she was going to let me have my way in her kitchen without interfering, as if humoring someone who’d been hurt enough already. The bitch knew. She must have seen the foot. Her eyes followed me every step of the way as if ready to pounce on my knife before I slit my veins with it.”

His internal musings are just funny yet heartbreaking most of the times.

“for you in silence, somewhere in Italy in the mid-eighties.”

I can’t help but think that this book is more like a book of ruminations of lost love and about someone who has maybe moved forward in life but never moved on. That’s a rather hard pill to swallow right? It was like Elio’s in a limbo waiting for his salvation. Alas, the only salvation that happened here is that Elio’s remain faithful to his heart. There may have been people whom he tried to loved, lived with and even be passionate about but there could only be one Oliver for him. It was sad. It will grate on you that he hasn’t moved on. It will make you mad, that this selfish American guy who captured the heart of this seventeen year old Italian boy has never returned such connection. At least that’s what I’ve felt from Oliver’s character. There was not enough regret from him. Oliver simply just moved on from that summer. It was just a memory for him. And that’s what annoyed me the most about this book. Oliver’s character is one selfish sonofabitch who doesn’t deserved Elio’s lifetime adoration. Well, that’s just me tho.

Overall, the writing for me was almost a reminiscent of Alire-Saenz’ technique but perhaps Aciman’s went overboard resulting to a mostly hifalutin dialogues. ‘rolled my eyes several times but knew that the ending should at least be hopeful or if not, hopeful for someone that is not Oliver. Alas, it’s a disaster. I don’t blame the author for this. I just regret investing so much time caring for Elio. And no, I’m not calling Oliver by his name.

I am hoping that I’d like the movie more.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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About The Author
André Aciman was born in Alexandria, Egypt and is an American memoirist, essayist, novelist, and scholar of seventeenth-century literature. He has also written many essays and reviews on Marcel Proust. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, The Paris Review, The New Republic, Condé Nast Traveler as well as in many volumes of The Best American Essays. Aciman received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University, has taught at Princeton and Bard and is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at The CUNY Graduate Center. He is currently chair of the Ph. D. Program in Comparative Literature and founder and director of The Writers’ Institute at the Graduate Center.

Aciman is the author of the Whiting Award-winning memoir Out of Egypt (1995), an account of his childhood as a Jew growing up in post-colonial Egypt. Aciman has published two other books: False Papers: Essays in Exile and Memory (2001), and a novel Call Me By Your Name (2007), which was chosen as a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and won the Lambda Literary Award for Men’s Fiction (2008). His forthcoming novel Eight White Nights (FSG) will be published on February 14, 2010