Book Review: Valor on the Move – Keira Andrews

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000039_00073]I’m sad to say that this isn’t what I’m used to reading from Keira. I guess my baby Amish boys have spoiled me. Let me set you straight though, it isn’t a bad book. It was actually a well-written story  that ended on a solid note. My main issue about it is that, I do not believe the chemistry between Rafa and Shane – didn’t see it and didn’t feel it at all.

Rafael Castillo aka “Valor” is the 21-year-old son of the US president who has lived a sheltered life from time immemorial (his dad’s a politico through and through) and decided to come out of the closet once his dad is out of the White House. Despite his family’s ambition for him to enter politics, Rafa is determined to do what he wants once his dad is out of the office – and that is cooking.

Then there’s the newest secret service assigned to guard Rafa. Shane find it easy to look after Rafa whom he built a friendship in a short period. He could see beyond the prim, shy Rafa and the sexual tension and intense attraction between them is what made his job harder to maintain professionally.

Another thing that concerns me here is their age-gap in terms of emotional maturity. I am very much for May-December affair but Rafa’s character just doesn’t sound like a mature guy to be entering a relationship with an experienced, out and proud gay man. I don’t know. I just find it all too improbable for their relationship to last until the end. For now it’s 60/40 for me so I guess, that’s still a win.

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Published September 9th 2015 by KA Books (first published September 7th 2015)

Buy now:
All Romance | Amazon | Barnes & Noble
iTunes | Kobo | Smashwords

About The Author
After writing for years yet never really finding the right inspiration, Keira discovered her voice in gay romance, which has become a passion. She writes contemporary, historical, paranormal and fantasy fiction, and—although she loves delicious angst along the way—Keira firmly believes in happy endings. For as Oscar Wilde once said, “The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means.”

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