When Queen Bey says #ImWithHer

“There was a time when a woman’s opinion did not matter. If you were black, white, Mexican, Asian, Muslim, educated, poor or rich; if you were a woman, it did not matter,” Beyoncé said. “Less than 100 years ago, women did not have the right to vote. Look how far we’ve come from having no voice to being on the brink of making history again by electing the first woman president.”

Hillary is joined by power couple Beyonce and Jay-Z to rally the crowd in Cleveland to turn out to vote for the only sane candidate this year - and no, it ain't Donald!

Hillary is joined by power couple Beyoncé and Jay-Z to rally the crowd in Cleveland to mobilize voters and vote for the only sane candidate this year – and no, it ain’t Donald!

“We have to vote. The world looks to us as a progressive country that leads change. Eight years ago, I was so inspired that my nephew, a young black child, could grow up knowing his dreams could be realized by witnessing a black president in office,” Beyoncé addressed the crowd at the rally, which aimed at mobilizing voters in the key swing state. “And now, we have the opportunity to create more change. I want my daughter to grow up seeing a woman lead our country and know that her possibilities are limitless.

“We have to think about the future of our daughters, of our sons, and vote for someone who cares for them as much as we do,” Beyoncé added. “And that is why, ‘I’m with her.'”

 

 

Flashback Friday: Hillary Clinton’s Speech at the United Nations 4th World Conference on Women #ImWithHer

hill-yesThen First Lady of the United States Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered what would be considered as one of the most influential speeches in the women’s rights movement  at the United Nation’s 4th World Conference on Women Plenary Session on September 5, 1995 in Beijing, China
Clinton took a similar position on LGBT rights in a 2011 speech to the United Nations on International Human Rights Day, declaring “[G]ay rights are human rights, and human rights are gay rights.”]
The speech was listed as number 35 in American Rhetoric’s Top 100 Speeches of the 20th Century
***
“Thank you very much, Gertrude Mongella, for your dedicated work that has brought us to this point, distinguished delegates, and guests:
I would like to thank the Secretary General for inviting me to be part of this important United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women. This is truly a celebration, a celebration of the contributions women make in every aspect of life: in the home, on the job, in the community, as mothers, wives, sisters, daughters, learners, workers, citizens, and leaders.
It is also a coming together, much the way women come together every day in every country. We come together in fields and factories, in village markets and supermarkets, in living rooms and board rooms. Whether it is while playing with our children in the park, or washing clothes in a river, or taking a break at the office water cooler, we come together and talk about our aspirations and concern. And time and again, our talk turns to our children and our families. However different we may appear, there is far more that unites us than divides us. We share a common future, and we are here to find common ground so that we may help bring new dignity and respect to women and girls all over the world, and in so doing bring new strength and stability to families as well.
By gathering in Beijing, we are focusing world attention on issues that matter most in our lives — the lives of women and their families: access to education, health care, jobs and credit, the chance to enjoy basic legal and human rights and to participate fully in the political life of our countries.
There are some who question the reason for this conference. Let them listen to the voices of women in their homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces. There are some who wonder whether the lives of women and girls matter to economic and political progress around the globe. Let them look at the women gathered here and at Huairou — the homemakers and nurses, the teachers and lawyers, the policymakers and women who run their own businesses. It is conferences like this that compel governments and peoples everywhere to listen, look, and face the world’s most pressing problems. Wasn’t it after all — after the women’s conference in Nairobi ten years ago that the world focused for the first time on the crisis of domestic violence?
Earlier today, I participated in a World Health Organization forum. In that forum, we talked about ways that government officials, NGOs, and individual citizens are working to address the health problems of women and girls. Tomorrow, I will attend a gathering of the United Nations Development Fund for Women. There, the discussion will focus on local — and highly successful — programs that give hard-working women access to credit so they can improve their own lives and the lives of their families.
What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well. That is why every woman, every man, every child, every family, and every nation on this planet does have a stake in the discussion that takes place here.
Over the past 25 years, I have worked persistently on issues relating to women, children, and families. Over the past two and a half years, I’ve had the opportunity to learn more about the challenges facing women in my own country and around the world.
I have met new mothers in Indonesia, who come together regularly in their village to discuss nutrition, family planning, and baby care. I have met working parents in Denmark who talk about the comfort they feel in knowing that their children can be cared for in safe, and nurturing after-school centers. I have met women in South Africa who helped lead the struggle to end apartheid and are now helping to build a new democracy. I have met with the leading women of my own hemisphere who are working every day to promote literacy and better health care for children in their countries. I have met women in India and Bangladesh who are taking out small loans to buy milk cows, or rickshaws, or thread in order to create a livelihood for themselves and their families. I have met the doctors and nurses in Belarus and Ukraine who are trying to keep children alive in the aftermath of Chernobyl.
The great challenge of this conference is to give voice to women everywhere whose experiences go unnoticed, whose words go unheard. Women comprise more than half the world’s population, 70% of the world’s poor, and two-thirds of those who are not taught to read and write. We are the primary caretakers for most of the world’s children and elderly. Yet much of the work we do is not valued — not by economists, not by historians, not by popular culture, not by government leaders.
At this very moment, as we sit here, women around the world are giving birth, raising children, cooking meals, washing clothes, cleaning houses, planting crops, working on assembly lines, running companies, and running countries. Women also are dying from diseases that should have been prevented or treated. They are watching their children succumb to malnutrition caused by poverty and economic deprivation. They are being denied the right to go to school by their own fathers and brothers. They are being forced into prostitution, and they are being barred from the bank lending offices and banned from the ballot box.
Those of us who have the opportunity to be here have the responsibility to speak for those who could not. As an American, I want to speak for those women in my own country, women who are raising children on the minimum wage, women who can’t afford health care or child care, women whose lives are threatened by violence, including violence in their own homes.
I want to speak up for mothers who are fighting for good schools, safe neighborhoods, clean air, and clean airwaves; for older women, some of them widows, who find that, after raising their families, their skills and life experiences are not valued in the marketplace; for women who are working all night as nurses, hotel clerks, or fast food chefs so that they can be at home during the day with their children; and for women everywhere who simply don’t have time to do everything they are called upon to do each and every day.
Speaking to you today, I speak for them, just as each of us speaks for women around the world who are denied the chance to go to school, or see a doctor, or own property, or have a say about the direction of their lives, simply because they are women. The truth is that most women around the world work both inside and outside the home, usually by necessity.
We need to understand there is no one formula for how women should lead our lives. That is why we must respect the choices that each woman makes for herself and her family. Every woman deserves the chance to realize her own God-given potential. But we must recognize that women will never gain full dignity until their human rights are respected and protected.
Our goals for this conference, to strengthen families and societies by empowering women to take greater control over their own destinies, cannot be fully achieved unless all governments — here and around the world — accept their responsibility to protect and promote internationally recognized human rights. The — The international community has long acknowledged and recently reaffirmed at Vienna that both women and men are entitled to a range of protections and personal freedoms, from the right of personal security to the right to determine freely the number and spacing of the children they bear. No one — No one should be forced to remain silent for fear of religious or political persecution, arrest, abuse, or torture.
Tragically, women are most often the ones whose human rights are violated. Even now, in the late 20th century, the rape of women continues to be used as an instrument of armed conflict. Women and children make up a large majority of the world’s refugees. And when women are excluded from the political process, they become even more vulnerable to abuse. I believe that now, on the eve of a new millennium, it is time to break the silence. It is time for us to say here in Beijing, and for the world to hear, that it is no longer acceptable to discuss women’s rights as separate from human rights.
These abuses have continued because, for too long, the history of women has been a history of silence. Even today, there are those who are trying to silence our words. But the voices of this conference and of the women at Huairou must be heard loudly and clearly:
It is a violation of human rights when babies are denied food, or drowned, or suffocated, or their spines broken, simply because they are born girls.
It is a violation of human rights when women and girls are sold into the slavery of prostitution for human greed — and the kinds of reasons that are used to justify this practice should no longer be tolerated.
It is a violation of human rights when women are doused with gasoline, set on fire, and burned to death because their marriage dowries are deemed too small.
It is a violation of human rights when individual women are raped in their own communities and when thousands of women are subjected to rape as a tactic or prize of war.
It is a violation of human rights when a leading cause of death worldwide among women ages 14 to 44 is the violence they are subjected to in their own homes by their own relatives.
It is a violation of human rights when young girls are brutalized by the painful and degrading practice of genital mutilation.
It is a violation of human rights when women are denied the right to plan their own families, and that includes being forced to have abortions or being sterilized against their will.
If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights once and for all. Let us not forget that among those rights are the right to speak freely — and the right to be heard.
Women must enjoy the rights to participate fully in the social and political lives of their countries, if we want freedom and democracy to thrive and endure. It is indefensible that many women in nongovernmental organizations who wished to participate in this conference have not been able to attend — or have been prohibited from fully taking part.
Let me be clear. Freedom means the right of people to assemble, organize, and debate openly. It means respecting the views of those who may disagree with the views of their governments. It means not taking citizens away from their loved ones and jailing them, mistreating them, or denying them their freedom or dignity because of the peaceful expression of their ideas and opinions.
In my country, we recently celebrated the 75th anniversary of Women’s Suffrage. It took 150 years after the signing of our Declaration of Independence for women to win the right to vote. It took 72 years of organized struggle, before that happened, on the part of many courageous women and men. It was one of America’s most divisive philosophical wars. But it was a bloodless war. Suffrage was achieved without a shot being fired.
But we have also been reminded, in V-J Day observances last weekend, of the good that comes when men and women join together to combat the forces of tyranny and to build a better world. We have seen peace prevail in most places for a half century. We have avoided another world war. But we have not solved older, deeply-rooted problems that continue to diminish the potential of half the world’s population.
Now it is the time to act on behalf of women everywhere. If we take bold steps to better the lives of women, we will be taking bold steps to better the lives of children and families too. Families rely on mothers and wives for emotional support and care. Families rely on women for labor in the home. And increasingly, everywhere, families rely on women for income needed to raise healthy children and care for other relatives.
As long as discrimination and inequities remain so commonplace everywhere in the world, as long as girls and women are valued less, fed less, fed last, overworked, underpaid, not schooled, subjected to violence in and outside their homes — the potential of the human family to create a peaceful, prosperous world will not be realized.
Let — Let this conference be our — and the world’s — call to action. Let us heed that call so we can create a world in which every woman is treated with respect and dignity, every boy and girl is loved and cared for equally, and every family has the hope of a strong and stable future. That is the work before you. That is the work before all of us who have a vision of the world we want to see — for our children and our grandchildren.
The time is now. We must move beyond rhetoric. We must move beyond recognition of problems to working together, to have the comment efforts to build that common ground we hope to see.
God’s blessing on you, your work, and all who will benefit from it.
Godspeed and thank you very much.”

If You’re LGBTQ, You Should Know This When Voting for Trump! #ImWithHer

Trump holding an inverted rainbow flag pretending to support the LGBTQ community.

Trump holding an inverted rainbow flag pretending to support the LGBTQ community.

Deplorable Donald Trump vows to sign the anti-LGBTQ “First Ammendment Defense Act,” making discrimination against LGBTQ folks legal among employers, businesses, landlords and healtcare providers on the basis of a religious belief.  Like seriously, who does this?

This would act to overturn the executive order signed in 2014 by President Obama prohibiting anti-LGBTQ discrimination among federal contractors.

More on… http://www.lgbtqnation.com/2016/09/donald-trump-pledges-sign-anti-lgbtq-first-amendment-defense-act/

#DumpTrump #NeverTrump

Why James Franco Is Voting For Hillary And Why You Should Too! #ImWithHer

Watch here why ‘King Cobra’ star James Franco is voting for Hillary Clinton to be the next president of the United States!

I don't usually endorse candidates, but when I do they're extraordinary #MostInterestingWoman

A video posted by James Franco (@jamesfrancotv) on

Variety Endorses Hillary for President! #ImWithHer

“We believe that Clinton is not only the best candidate for the job, but the only candidate.”

Hillary Clinton campaign event, Des Moines, USA - 29 Sep 2016

Click on Hillary tor read.

Gallery

In Photos: A Day in Brgy. San Diego, Lian, Batangas

This gallery contains 18 photos.

Book Review: The Weight Of It All – N.R. Walker

the-weight-of-it-allDate of Publication: September 12, 2016
Genres and Themes: LGBTQI, Romance, Comedy, Body Image
Publisher: BlueHeart Press
Format: 244 pages, ebook
ISBN13: 978-1-5375-6116-5
Cover Artist: Sara York
Characters: Henry Beckett, Reed Henske

I find this book a bit different from the author’s previous works. I knew that N.R. Walker is witty, funny and all but, I did not know that she could be THIS funny. Here, she gave us funny scenes where you will totally laugh out loud. She’s funny in a way that is beyond moving. I mean, a few writers can do that – being tragically funny or funny and tragic at the same time. In a good way that is. You’re probably confused now and I am too, but I will get to the point by the end of this review  (or not).

Henry’s character is one adorable character that we rarely see in books – in gay romance in particular and as its main character no less. So it’s refreshing to have an overweight, middle-aged corporate gay guy to be the center of the story. He’s not a demi-god with that vampiric-good looks and a body of an Olympian swimmer. In short, he’s an everyday guy! I can totally relate to him.

He covers his insecurities with self-deprecating humor. His douche of a boyfriend for eight years left him because he’s apparently “overweight and fat.” That was the douche’s exact words and I wanted to punch the guy with a Manny Pacquiao left hook. Only, there was no (warning: spoiler ahead) V for Vendetta in store for us. Henry has got class obviously.

With Reed’s help, his mofo personal trainer, Henry was able to truly see the real him. He was able to transform himself not only physically but also mentally. He learned to love himself. And he fell in love in the process.

The romance between him and Reed is just about the sweetest ever. I appreciate the slow-burn, that creeping feeling of fondness and eventually the love between them. It’s totally awe-inspiring.

The book also includes a goofy bunch of secondary characters. I loved Anika and Sean! They’re fantastic bffs! Melinda and Emily are amazing! And how can we not thank the douche ex???! He totally started this story! Haha!

In my opinion, this is N.R. Walker’s best book to date after the epic Red Dirt Heart series. It’s about self-image, self-love, and the valuable lesson that even if the mind is blind in seeing the real you, the heart will always feel the truth in you. I don’t know if that make sense to you but it does to me. Read this now people, like right NOW!

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars!

BUY LINKS:
AMAZON us | amazon uk | BARNES & NOBLE

 

About the Author
N.R. Walker is an Australian author, who loves her genre of gay romance. She loves writing and spends far too much time doing it, but wouldn’t have it any other way. She is many things; a mother, a wife, a sister, a writer. She has pretty, pretty boys who live in her head, who don’t let her sleep at night unless she gives them life with words. She likes it when they do dirty, dirty things…but likes it even more when they fall in love. She used to think having people in her head talking to her was weird, until one day she happened across other writers who told her it was normal. She’s been writing ever since…

Thank You from the victims of Pulse #OrlandoStrong #WeAreOrlando #ForThe49

for-the-49

“In total, Equality Florida raised over $9M USD for victim relief following the horrific tragedy at Pulse Nightclub on June 12, 2016.

Those funds will be disbursed to the victims on September 27. This video is to thank all those who gave and to all those who believe love conquers hate.

To stay involved in Equality Florida’s ongoing efforts to make Florida a safer, more inclusive place to live for all, please visit http://www.gofundme.com/forthe49

Happy 7th!

7thApparently, it’s my site’s 7th anniversary today according to WordPress! Yay!

I think the last time I celebrated my blogging anniversary here was in 2012 when I was still with my then boyfriend Dom. Teehee.

From a fashion blog to a travel blog to movies and books review blog – I think I pretty much covered every aspect of my life that I’ve an interest with.

So there ya go, in case you’re wondering – this blogsite turns 7 today!

Thank you readers!!!!!!!

Pure Genius: ‘Kill For You’ by Skylar Grey featuring Eminem (With Lyrics)

Eminem and Skylar Grey

(Skylar Grey)
You gon’ make make me a believer
Even if that shit ain’t true
You gon’ make me commit murder
Baby, I’d kill for you

In my eyes
Even if you are wrong, you are right
Even if there is a terrible crime
It’s alright, cause I got your back, and I know you got mine
I belong to the church of your name
Sing a song, cause I worship the ground you walk on
If I pray for you, I know you’ll be there

You gon’ make make me a believer
Even if that shit ain’t true
You gon’ make me commit murder
Baby, I’d kill for you

In my bed I believe every word that you’ve said
Just a kiss and you make me forget
All the bad, the battles we lost, the bodies we hid
You don’t know, just how far I’d be willing to go
You put the cracks into my moral code
So you can count on me to always be there

You gon’ make make me a believer
Even if that shit ain’t true
You gon’ make me commit murder
Baby, I’d kill for you

Oh, Lord, forgive my weary hands
And for what they may do
I’ll carry out his evil plans
If he wants me to

(Eminem)
In your dream, you’re drowning, I just walked in and saved you
I’m your alternate escape route, the alter you pray to
Your ultimate savior, your behavior is altered
Ain’t your fault cause I made you
Brainwashed and persuade you
Gibraltar, you’re fatal, never falter or waver
When you causing the danger I’m your guardian angel
Nobody can tell you shit, you’re already major
Mine just follow me, babe, you
Won’t be sorry you stayed, you
Always ride, whatever the plan is
To the end, even if I led us into an ambush
Even if we robbed the First National and cops caught us redhanded
They’re coming at us, and we’re trapped, put our backs up
Against the wall, and it’s too tall
You catapult me or hold the ladder for me
Stay back to get captured, take the fall
You make it all worth it
Baby doll, you’re perfect the way you are
Accidents happen
All I know is you love me, that’s really all that matters
And any who cross our paths are just collateral damage
At your side, got your lateral, back, your front, diagonal
Backwards, blackbirds, we attack like animals
When they threaten what we have it’s a natural reaction
You lay a bitch flat on her back in a second flat for me
Who tries to take your man from you
It’s blasphemy, it’s another casualty, you’ll go whatever route
Whatever you have to do, you blast for me, I never doubt

(Skylar Grey)
You gon’ make make me a believer
Even if that shit ain’t true
You gon’ make me commit murder
Baby, I’d kill for you

###