Book Review: The Tin Box – Kim Fielding

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The Tin Box may have seemed like a really promising novel but it turns out to be a bit underwhelming. William Lyon is working on his dissertation and took a job as a caretaker of an unused old asylum in the small town of Jelly Valley. With the divorce from his wife being finalized, William is still in the process of coming out of the closet and his very repressive past. While checking out the asylum, he discovered a tin box containing letters from a patient whose plight so clearly reflects his own. Then he meets flamboyant and outgoing Colby Anderson who works at the general store and is very openly gay. Through Colby, William learned to let go and decided to live his life the way he wanted to. With their budding friendship turning into romance, William also needs to prove to Colby that he’s ready to take what they have into the next level and make the owner of those letters from the tin box proud.

There was a really good concept here that somehow failed to materialize. Those letters inside the tin box tore me into pieces and they would have been a great starter for the story to follow a different and more involved romance between William and Colby. It’s just too bad that as the story goes on, it went downhill and became a snoozefest. I feel that there should’ve been more to it in connection with the letters. Sadly, that was not realised at all.

 Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

Published September 20th 2013 by Dreamspinner Press

Buy now:
Dreamspinner Press | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

About The Author

Kim Fielding lives in California and travels as often as she can manage. A professor by day, at night she rushes into a phonebooth to change into her author costume (which involves comfy clothes instead of Spandex and is, sadly, lacking a cape). Her superpowers include the ability to write nearly anywhere, often while simultaneously doling out homework assistance to her children. Her favorite word to describe herself is “eclectic” and she finally got that third tattoo.

All royalties from her novels Stasis, Flux and Equipoise are donated to Doctors Without Borders.

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